lizards, 2008-2009

August 10, 2010

Here are two more years’ better lizards shots.  Some specimens are shown more than once.

western fence liz, male, South Snake Range

mid May 08, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), male, South Snake Range, White Pine Co, NV

When you see blue spangles on the dorsal scales of this species, then it’s a male.  A later post will cover distinguishing the sex of these iguanid lizards.

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short horned liz, female in shade, Wasatch Mtns

early July 08, short horned liz (Phrynosoma hernandesi), female in shade, Wasatch Mtns, Salt Lake Co, UT

This is how I found this large adult female–hugging its warm rock that had recently been sunlit.  Then I temporarily moved it nearby into the fading sun & shot the photo below.

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short horned liz, female in sun, Wasatch Mtns

early July 08, short horned liz (Phrynosoma hernandesi), female in sun, Wasatch Mtns, Salt Lake Co, UT

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short horned liz, subadult, Wasatch Mtns

late Aug 08, short horned liz (Phrynosoma hernandesi), subadult, Wasatch Mtns, Salt Lake Co, UT

This subadult was down in the gambel oak thicket, rather than up in the sunnier, more open part of the slope.

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sideblotch liz eating moth, Oquirrh Mtns

mid Sept 08, sideblotch liz (Uta stansburiana) eating moth, Oquirrh Mtns, Utah Co, UT

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western fence liz, Oquirrh Mtns

early May 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), Oquirrh Mtns, Utah Co, UT

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western skink liz, male following female, at can, Sheeprock Mtns

mid May 09, western skink liz (Plestiodon skiltonianus), male following female, at can, Sheeprock Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

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Different shot of same specimen above:

western skink liz, male following female, in veg, Sheeprock Mtns

mid May 09, western skink liz (Plestiodon skiltonianus), male following female, in veg, Sheeprock Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

Here, I found a female skink under a rock.  When I held it to photograph it, it nervously expelled a little substance from its cloaca.  Shortly after that, this red-chinned male appeared, smelling the air.  It was so intent on finding the female it knew must be near, it ignored me and I shot these photos.

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sagebrush liz caught by wandering garter snake, Sheeprock Mtns

mid May 09, sagebrush liz (Sceloporus graciosus), subadult, caught by wandering garter snake (Thamnophis elegans vagrans), female, Sheeprock Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

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Different shot of same specimens above:

sagebrush liz inside wandering garter snake, Sheeprock Mtns

mid May 09, sagebrush liz (Sceloporus graciosus), subadult, inside wandering garter snake (Thamnophis elegans vagrans), female, Sheeprock Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

This predation was staged.  I found a scrawny adult female gartersnake & photoed it.  Then, it seemed too tired to bother retreating as energetically as they often can.  I wondered how it would react to a sagebrush lizard held in front of it, so I caught one nearby and offered it, and this was the result.

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western fence liz, female, South Snake Range

late May 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), female, South Snake Range, White Pine Co, NV

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western skink liz, male from under rock, Sheeprock Mtns

late May 09, western skink liz (Plestiodon skiltonianus), male from under rock, Sheeprock Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

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western fence liz, male, Simpson Mtns

late May 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), male, Simpson Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

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western skink liz, gravid female, Wasatch Mtns

early June 09, western skink liz (Plestiodon skiltonianus), gravid female, Wasatch Mtns, Wasatch Co, UT

This female was under a rock much warmer than this species usually chooses to rest beneath.  And it was fatter than usual.  And, it was less energetic than usual.  So, I assume she was gravid.  But maybe I’m wrong.

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sagebrush liz, female, Wasatch Mtns

early June 09, sagebrush liz (Sceloporus graciosus), female, Wasatch Mtns, Wasatch Co, UT

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great basin collared liz, female, NE Deep Ck Mtns

early July 09, great basin collared liz (Crotaphytus bicinctores), female, NE Deep Ck Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

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western fence liz, female, NE Deep Ck Mtns

early July 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), female, NE Deep Ck Mtns, Tooele Co, UT

On occasional photo sessions like this one, a lizard can “seem curious” about the photographer.  It’s not just trying to get away, & not just barely tolerating my presence.  But perhaps its “curiosity” is solely a sort of evaluation of what sort of threat I might be?

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tiger whiptail liz, Mineral Mtns

late July 09, tiger whiptail liz (Aspidoscelis tigris), Mineral Mtns, Beaver Co, UT

After 3 and 1/2 seasons of carrying around this digital camera, I stumbled onto the awareness that it has a zoom capability.  Hah–now I can photo whiptails.  Without a zoom (or a lizard noose, that I don’t carry), you might as well not try to photo whiptails.  They are speedy & keep their distance.

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western fence liz, Mineral Mtns

late July 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), Mineral Mtns, Beaver Co, UT

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Different shot of same specimen above:

western fence liz, w/ P. rostriflorus, Mineral Mtns

late July 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), w/ Penstemon rostriflorus, Mineral Mtns, Beaver Co, UT

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western fence liz, neonate, Antelope Range

mid Oct 09, western fence liz (Sceloporus occidentalis), neonate, Antelope Range, Iron Co, UT

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One Response to “lizards, 2008-2009”

  1. […] two photos below I included earlier in a lizards’ post, but I will repost them here.  The gartersnake above and in the two below is the same specimen. […]

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